What is The Lymphatic System?

What Is The Lymphatic System?

The lymphatic system is the body’s drainage network that takes on various forms and consists of different components, such as lymphatic vessels, nodes, and spleen. The organs in the lymphatic system carry out various tasks to maintain a healthy human body.

The most important function in this regard is to remove bodily waste and excess water from tissues and to carry nutrients into tissues. Lymph nodes, for example, contain tissue that can fight infection and at the same time produce lymphocytes – a type of white blood cell. Lymph vessels transport lymph, which is formed from blood plasma and contains proteins and other materials.

The composition of lymph:

Lymph is a clear fluid that transports substances such as white blood cells and oxygen through your body’s network of lymphatic vessels and back into the bloodstream. It also removes waste products from cells.

Unlike peripheral veins, however, it does not carry blood but only the component called protein or fluid protein via protein-carrying cells (plasma). The word ‘lymph’ comes from the Greek lympha, meaning “water”. The protein in the lymph is about 25% of what it is in blood plasma.

The composition of fatty acids:

Fatty acids are a major component of all dietary fats and oils, as well as proteins. The fat stored from animal source serves as a primary energy source for cells, and provide essential elements for various hormones-like prostaglandins that promote digestion, formation of DNA and other key molecules, immune responses, etc.,

normal inflammatory response to bacterial or viral infection through interaction between prostaglandin receptors and cytokines, etc. In general, there are three types of fatty acids: saturated fatty acid (SFA), monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA). They differ in structure and their ability to combine with oxygen.

Why are fatty acids important?

The cells in the body need fats to function properly. Some fatty acids are part of cell walls, membranes, or platelets. In fact, fatty acids make up one-third of the dry weight of the human brain, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. Other types help regulate blood flow through hormones such as prostaglandins and thromboxanes.

Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to reduce cardiac arrhythmia by decreasing heart rate and prolonging ventricular refractory periods. Lower bone mass density has been associated with a higher risk for cardiovascular disease among postmenopausal women who consumed dietary fat rich in certain omega-6 fatty acids.

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According to the National Institutes of Health, a high intake of trans-fatty acids increases total and LDL (the bad) cholesterol while decreasing HDL (the good) cholesterol in the blood. Consumption of omega-3 fatty acids may be responsible for some preventive effects on certain types of cancer, with reduced risk among people who have increased their dietary omega-3 fatty acid intake.

Omega 3, 6, and 9:

There are three primary essential fatty acids:

linoleic acid(LA), alpha-linolenic acid(ALA)(known as omega−3 fatty acid), and gamma-linolenic acid(GLA)(known as omega−6 fatty acid). In addition to this there are other fatty acids that play an important role in the human body, but if taken in excess amounts may result in toxicity or other problems.

These are arachidonic acid(AA)(known as omega−6 fatty acid), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)(known as omega−3 fatty acid), and docosahexaenoic acid(DHA)(known as omega−3 fatty acid).

Omega 3:

It is a polyunsaturated fat with a double bond at the third carbon atom from the end of the carbon chain. This unsaturated FA can have two different shapes, both of them cis-configuration, although one shape has been shown to be predominant under physiological conditions. The Omega-3 series is generally used to describe the omega-3 fatty acids that are important for human health, alpha-linolenic acid(ALA)and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA).

The amount of omega-3s in tissue is highly dependent on the amount of LA consumed. When consumed as part of food, Omega 3 FA are frequently found to have many beneficial effects including lowering levels of triglycerides(blood fats), blood pressure and heart rate, slowing age-related mental decline, and reducing inflammation.

Most microalgae have the capability of producing Omega-3 fatty acids, but they are usually not rich sources for humans. A major reason for this is that the EPA and DHA are produced by marine microalgae with a specific cyclic desaturation-elongation pathway called the Omega-3 Synthetase. This is absent in most terrestrial species of algae. The amounts of EPA, DHA contained in many species are often small due to the lack of this biosynthetic pathway.

what is the function of the lymphatic system:

1) Acts as a defence system against infection by removing pathogens, wastes, and foreign substances from the tissues. This is done through lymph nodes.

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2) Removes excess fluid to maintain the correct amount in the body. The fluid that does not contain proteins or cells is returned into general circulation, causing no harm.

3) Produces antibodies to help fight infections by using white blood cells within lymph nodes.

4) Helps with fat absorption:

lymph fluid carries large amounts of lipids (fats) after it has been channeled through small vessels called lacteals near where it enters the digestive tract at the top of the small intestine. These are then transported into larger veins near the heart before being further processed in organs such as the liver.

1) Acts as a defence system against infection by removing pathogens, wastes, and foreign substances from the tissues. This is done through lymph nodes.

2) Removes excess fluid to maintain the correct amount in the body. The fluid that does not contain proteins or cells is returned into general circulation, causing no harm.

3) Produces antibodies to help fight infections by using white blood cells within lymph nodes.

4) Helps with fat absorption:

lymph fluid carries large amounts of lipids (fats) after it has been channeled through small vessels called lacteals near where it enters the digestive tract at the top of the small intestine. These are then transported into larger veins near the heart before being further processed in organs such as the liver.

4) Helps with fat absorption:

lymph fluid carries large amounts of lipids (fats) after it has been channeled through small vessels called lacteals near where it enters the digestive tract at the top of the small intestine. These are then transported into larger veins near the heart before being further processed in organs such as the liver.

5) Lymph helps maintain body temperature:

lymph fluid surrounds blood vessels, helping to lower body temperature when necessary by acting as an insulating blanket over hot tissues. When this happens you become flushed because more blood is pumped around your body to try and keep warm.

Flushed skin becomes redder than usual for a while which is what causes the “heat rash”. The excess fluid and blood flow cause sweat glands to work harder, which makes you hotter. Once the cause of the fever has gone, so will the heat rash.

6) Helps with nutrient absorption:

lymph fluid carries what is called chyle into small capillary vessels where it mixes and comes into contact with amino acids and fatty acids that come from digested fats (lipids). These nutrients are then absorbed by tiny projections on cells called villi in the small intestine which increases their surface area for absorption.

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7) Helps control body temperature:

during exercise or when you become overheated, your muscles produce heat dioxide (a chemical compound made up of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen). Blood passing through them picks up this heat and it is then picked up by the lymph nodes which pump more warmth out of your body via blood vessels.

8) Helps maintain a stable pH:

if you don’t have enough healthy bacteria in your gut, this can slow down digestion. This reduces the release of stomach acid, bile, and digestive enzymes from glands in the small intestine called Brunner’s glands, which are needed to help digest proteins.

This leads to a build-up of undigested food particles that cannot be absorbed into capillary blood vessels. These become trapped within tissues where they rot or ferment producing waste products such as acids or alcohols that drain off into lymph fluid for removal during normal bodily functions such as sweating. The acids may irritate the intestinal mucous membrane, leading to colic.

9) Helps in cell replacement:

when cells become old or damaged they are replaced with new ones by “transdifferentiation”. This is when the DNA in a cell becomes dormant and another cell type that already exists takes over its function.

The process involves phagocytes (white blood cells), monocytes (a type of white blood cell), macrophages (cells in lymph nodes that engulf foreign material), plasma cells (white blood cells which produce antibodies), and stem cells within lymph glands. These take on the characteristics of other types of cells so helping your body maintain optimum health.

10) Helps mount an effective immune response :

help fight infection by removing pathogens, wastes, and dead cells via lymph nodes and eventually, the liver. They also stimulate antibodies which play a role in disease resistance and immune response.

11) Helps produce antibodies :

plasma cells (white blood cells which produce antibodies) are present within lymph glands and bone marrow where they pass their antibody-producing capabilities onto new ones that continue the vital job of fighting infection and disease.

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