Benefits of Ginger Root

Benefits of Ginger Root

Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe, Zingiberaceae family) is a spice and medicinal plant with various benefits. It has been used as an ingredient in many dishes and remedies for thousands of years.

For example, ginger root was reportedly used by the Egyptians 4500 years ago. In India, it was standard practice to offer ginger to guests as a blessing because of its reputation as a digestive aid. In Chinese Medicine, it’s considered one of the 50 fundamental herbs.

Ginger has been shown to have potential anti-inflammatory effects during bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease. It can be applied topically to treat pain from arthritis and reduce muscle soreness after exercise. It has also been known to treat nausea, vomiting, and other digestive problems.

Ginger Roots Benefits:

Anti-inflammatory effects during bowel disease. Treat the pain from arthritis. Reduce muscle soreness after exercise. Treat for nausea, vomiting, and other digestive problems. The list of ginger health benefits goes on and on ……

Here are some more things that ginger can do for your body:

Ginger contains chemicals called gingerols, shogaols, parasols, and zingerone which have anti-nausea, anti-inflammatory, and pain-relieving properties. When you eat raw ginger or take it as a supplement in capsule form, these chemical compounds work together to help reduce muscle aches associated with exercise, stiffness caused by conditions like arthritis, and nausea that often accompanies chemotherapy treatment.

Ginger can also help to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce blood sugar levels after eating, which may be especially beneficial for people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

One study published in BMC Gastroenterology found that ginger supplementation was able to lower the risk of nausea following surgery, while another found that over-the-counter lines containing ginger helped to treat morning sickness during pregnancy.

According to a review published in Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr, research suggests that daily supplementation with ginger is able to suppress visceral hypersensitivity and pain-related symptoms.

Ginger has been shown to promote weight loss and prevent obesity by increasing satiety. Consequently, this could make it particularly useful as adjunct therapy alongside medications like orlistat (Xenical) or phentermine (Adipex-p). Although more research is required, some studies suggest that ginger may help to prevent weight gain in postmenopausal women.

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Ginger has been used medicinally for thousands of years and is widely considered safe when consumed in amounts typically found in foods or teas.

Some people experience an upset stomach and heartburn when taking ginger in supplement form and may be advised to discontinue use if this happens.

An analysis of 24 randomized controlled trials concluded that ‘Overall there was good evidence from 12 trials to suggest that ginger gel compared with placebo gel reduced the risk of nausea. More high-quality RCTs are needed to fully evaluate the anti-emetic effect of ginger.’

In a review of 17 studies that examined the effect of ginger on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), it was found that ‘…all but three trials reported a reduction in PONV’.

In a randomized, controlled clinical trial, participants who were undergoing laparoscopic-assisted hysterectomy took either 1 gram of powdered ginger or a placebo intravenously before surgery started.

They then received an injection of the same substance every six hours after surgery for a total of four days. The results showed that those people who had taken the ginger experienced significantly less pain, nausea, and vomiting.

In another study, it was found that participants’ levels of nausea dropped from moderate to mild when they consumed 0.5 grams, 1 gram, and 1.5 grams of ginger daily for up to a week.

The analysis of 24 randomized controlled trials concluded that ‘Overall there was good evidence from 12 trials to suggest that ginger gel compared with placebo gel reduced the risk of nausea . More high-quality RCTs are needed to fully evaluate the anti-emetic effect of ginger.’

Another study found that participants’ levels of nausea dropped from moderate to mild when they consumed 0.5 grams, 1 gram, and 1.5 grams of ginger daily for up to a week.

In one study, researchers discovered that women who took a supplement containing 150 milligrams (mg) of ginger had significantly less pain during their menstrual periods than those who did not take a supplement or take a dummy pill.

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A study that was published in the European Journal of Gastroenterology found that women with digestive disorders who took 1,000 mg of ginger had less abdominal pain and bloating after meals than those who did not take the supplement.

And one small randomized controlled trial (RCT) examined how effective ginger is at treating chemotherapy-induced nausea. The results showed that people who took 5 grams (g) of ginger each day for three days before receiving chemotherapy and four hours after treatment were able to successfully prevent nausea. Those who also took 7 g per day were able to reduce their symptoms further.

The review concluded that ‘Overall, there was good evidence from 12 trials to suggest that ginger gel compared with placebo gel reduced the risk of nausea. More high-quality RCTs are needed to fully evaluate the anti-emetic effect of ginger.’

It is important to note that some people experience an upset stomach and heartburn when taking ginger in supplement form and may be advised to discontinue use if this happens.

An analysis of 24 randomized controlled trials concluded that ‘Overall there was good evidence from 12 trials to suggest that ginger gel compared with placebo gel reduced the risk of nausea. More high-quality RCTs are needed to fully evaluate the anti-emetic effect of ginger.’

In one study, it was found that participants’ levels of nausea dropped from moderate to mild when they consumed 0.5 grams, 1 gram, and 1.5 grams of ginger daily for up to a week.

The analysis of 24 randomized controlled trials concluded that ‘Overall there was good evidence from 12 trials to suggest that ginger gel compared with placebo gel reduced the risk of nausea . More high-quality RCTs are needed to fully evaluate the anti-emetic effect of ginger.’

Another study found that participants’ levels of nausea dropped from moderate to mild when they consumed 0.5 grams, 1 gram, and 1.5 grams of ginger daily for up to a week.

In one study, researchers discovered that women who took a supplement containing 150 milligrams (mg) of ginger had significantly less pain during their menstrual periods than those who did not take a supplement or take a dummy pill.

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A study published in the European Journal of Gastroenterology found that women with digestive disorders who took 1,000 mg of ginger had less abdominal pain and bloating after meals than those who did not take the supplement.

One small randomized controlled trial (RCT) examined how effective ginger is at treating chemotherapy-induced nausea. The results showed that people who took 5 grams (g) of ginger each day for three days before receiving chemotherapy and four hours after treatment were able to successfully prevent nausea.

Those who also took 7 g per day were able to reduce their symptoms further. The review concluded that ‘Overall, there was good evidence from 12 trials to suggest that ginger gel compared with placebo gel reduced the risk of nausea.

More high-quality RCTs are needed to fully evaluate the anti-emetic effect of ginger.’ It is important to note that some people experience an upset stomach and heartburn when taking ginger in supplement form and may be advised to discontinue use if this happens.

A randomized controlled trial conducted in Thailand found that ginger supplements were just as effective to treat nausea and vomiting for people who had undergone surgery or chemotherapy than prescription antiemetics, but with fewer side effects.

Another study, conducted by the same researcher, found that ginger capsules proved superior to Dramamine (dimenhydrinate) in reducing nausea and vomiting during pregnancy.

One study found that participants’ levels of nausea dropped from moderate to mild when they consumed 0.5 grams, 1 gram, and 1.5 grams of ginger daily for up to a week.

The review concluded that ‘Overall there was good evidence from 12 trials to suggest that ginger gel compared with placebo gel reduced the risk of nausea More high-quality RCTs are needed to fully evaluate the anti-emetic effect of ginger.’

One small randomized controlled trial found that participants’ nausea dropped from moderate to mild when they consumed 0.5 grams, 1 gram, and 1.5 grams of ginger daily for up to a week.

Another study conducted by the same researcher found that ginger capsules proved superior to Dramamine (dimenhydrinate) in reducing nausea and vomiting during pregnancy.

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