Symptoms of Kidney Failure

Symptoms of Kidney Failure

Symptoms of kidney failure (kidney disease) can include

• Urine that smells bad or looks different than usual, such as having a tea color

• Swelling in your legs, ankles, or feet

• Shortness of breath or trouble breathing because of fluid on the lungs (this is more common if you have advanced kidney disease)

• Itchy skin or yellowish of the eyes or skin (jaundice), which can happen if your liver isn’t working right

• If you are urinating less often than normal, feeling very thirsty, or feeling very hungry all the time because of a lack of energy (these are more common in children)

Symptoms of kidney failure (kidney disease) can include:

• Urine that smells bad or looks different than usual, such as having a tea color

• Swelling in your legs, ankles, or feet

• Shortness of breath or trouble breathing because of fluid on the lungs (this is more common if you have advanced kidney disease)

• Itchy skin or yellowish of the eyes or skin (jaundice), which can happen if your liver isn’t working right

• If you are urinating less often than normal, feeling very thirsty, or feeling very hungry all the time because of a lack of energy (these are more common in children)

How long can you live with end-stage kidney failure?

The prognosis varies depending on the cause of kidney failure and other health conditions. If you have end-stage kidney failure, your doctor will likely talk to you about a treatment known as dialysis and getting ready for a potential transplant. With these options and continuing care and treatment, many people with end-stage renal disease can expect to live around five years.

End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) is when the kidneys can no longer effectively remove wastes and adjust bodily fluids, causing acute symptoms including nausea, vomiting, fluid retention, shortness of breath, or fatigue. It can eventually lead to death if not treated with dialysis or a kidney transplant.

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Symptoms of ESRD include nausea, vomiting, shortness of breath, and fatigue.

There are two types of kidney failure – acute or chronic. Acute renal failure describes a sudden loss in kidney function and is often caused by an injury to the kidneys, dehydration, or a severe infection. Chronic renal disease is when the kidneys gradually lose their ability to function over time.

ESRD is also divided into two categories – pre-dialysis and post-dialysis. Pre-dialysis describes someone who has lost kidney function for less than three months, while the term “end-stage” means kidney function has been lost for three months or more.

Types of kidney disease:

Pre-dialysis is a term used for acute renal failure which occurs when kidney function falls below 10% of normal. Symptoms include swelling in the legs and ankles, shortness of breath, vomiting, mental confusion or encephalopathy, and fatigue.

In the chronic setting, people with ESRD may have been known to have kidney disease for months or years. Symptoms of chronic renal failure can be vague and non-specific such as fatigue, anorexia, nausea and vomiting, edema in the legs and feet, and weakness; these symptoms may also mimic other diseases like heart failure.

It is important to know the difference between acute and chronic renal failure because their treatment, prognosis, and management can be vastly different.

Kidney failure that occurs over a long period of time is known as chronic renal disease or chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this situation, the kidneys have been gradually losing their ability to function over months or years. The symptoms are similar to those seen in pre-dialysis AKI, but they may not be as pronounced due to the gradual onset of the disease.

How will you know you have kidney disease?

Unfortunately, many people who have chronic renal failure often do not realize it because their symptoms are vague and non-specific. They may mistake their symptoms of fatigue, nausea, and vomiting, weakness, or confusion for something else.

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The only way to know if you have kidney disease is to get regular blood work done by your doctor. If the results show protein in your urine or abnormally low blood calcium levels (hypocalcemia), this could indicate renal disease; however, a definitive diagnosis is more difficult to make.

How long can you live with end-stage kidney disease?

In the pre-dialysis setting, individuals with ESRD have a life expectancy of several weeks to months following the onset of symptoms. In this situation, death usually occurs from cardiovascular or respiratory failure which can be sudden and unexpected.

In the chronic, post-dialysis setting, individuals with ESRD have a life expectancy of five years or less depending on their age and comorbidities. In this situation, death usually occurs from cardiovascular disease, infection, or bleeding due to poor immune function, or organ failure which can be sudden and unexpected.

Reducing your risk for kidney disease:

Kidney disease is often preventable by taking measures to reduce risk factors. Some of the most important steps you can take are: drinking plenty of fluids, limiting your exposure to medications that may damage the kidneys, eating a healthy diet low in fat and protein while maintaining optimal weight, controlling diabetes if you have it, and reducing your exposure to heavy metals like lead and mercury.

Kidney disease treatment can be difficult because there are so many medications that damage the kidneys, but treatment options may include dialysis, kidney transplantation, or leaving the condition untreated. In some cases, individuals with ESRD who have been without symptoms for a long time may choose not to seek treatment.

If you have kidney disease, it is important to know the difference between acute and chronic renal failure so that you can ensure your condition is being treated properly. Chronic or end-stage renal failure is generally irreversible, but treatment options do exist which may allow individuals with ESRD to live longer lives.

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Today’s guest post comes from Sherry Ross, a practicing gynecologist and media personality from Santa Monica, California. She is board-certified by the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology and has practiced medicine for more than 20 years.

what color is urine when your kidneys are failing?

A healthy individual’s urine should be a pale yellow color. However, darker (orange or cloudy) colored urine can indicate problems with the kidneys and may signify disease.

Darker-than-normal urine is known as “myoglobinuria,” meaning myoglobin (a substance released in muscle cells that helps supply oxygen to muscle tissue) has leaked out of the muscle cells into the bloodstream.

There are several causes of renal failure, including high blood pressure, diabetes, glomerulonephritis (inflammation of the filters in the kidneys), multiple myeloma (a type of cancer that affects white blood cells in bone marrow), and others. The most common cause is due to the kidneys being overworked from diabetes.

In severe cases of renal failure, myoglobin can accumulate in the blood and lead to kidney damage. This is known as “rhabdomyolysis,” which essentially means a breakdown in muscle tissue resulting in a release of muscle fiber contents into the bloodstream that can cause severe kidney damage if not treated quickly.

Kidney failure can sometimes be sudden and unexpected, but it is most often a slow progression. If you have any symptoms of kidney disease that are persistent or worsening, do not let time pass before seeing your doctor for an evaluation.

kidney damage causes urine to turn brown:

There are several types of renal failure, the most common being glomerulonephritis. Glomerulonephritis is an inflammation of the glomeruli (tubules within the kidneys that filter waste products from the blood).

When the cause is unknown or there are multiple causes, it is referred to as “idiopathic nephrotic syndrome.” There are many potential biological and environmental causes for glomerulonephritis.

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