Stomach Cutting Effects and Gastric Bypass Surgery Side Effects

Stomach Cutting Effects and Gastric Bypass Surgery Side Effects

Stomach cutting is one of the most deadly and destructive forms of self-harm. A stomach cut, also known as a stomach slash, is an injury that cuts across the abdomen vertically. The victims mostly inflict cuts on their upper belly or lower chest area, and rarely in between.

The objective of this form of self-harm isn’t to kill oneself but rather to inflict pain, discomfort, and punishment into the body. Stomach cutting effects are extremely harmful to the mental health of that person who is indulged in this act. These stomach cuts have a great tendency to become fatal if not healed with proper treatments on time.

Stomach cutting:

Self-harm is the act of inflicting pain and suffering, by one’s own will, in order to feel better. It is often done without the actual intention of suicide but it can still be very dangerous at times. Most of the self-harmers are adolescent girls who tend to cut themselves when facing some distress or anxiety from their life.

Self-harm includes a wide range of behaviors like burning oneself, inflicting cuts on the body with sharp objects like knives and blades, scratching one’s own body part violently, purposely preventing wounds from healing properly, etc.

Stomach cutting is one of the most common forms of self-harm that can be seen in the majority of adolescents aged between 12 to 25 years old. While suicide attempts are more common in people who are bullied, this form of self-harm is observed among teenagers who are not being bullied.

Stomach cutting involves making a deep cut into the upper abdomen or lower chest with a sharp object. The person inflicts cuts on his/her own will and watches as the blood oozes out of the wounds, thus causing an emotional release which is the most common reason behind stomach cutting.

Gastric bypass surgery side effects:

In a study published in Nature Neuroscience, researchers from Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center reveal that the brains of obese patients who have undergone gastric bypass surgery show major differences from those of obese people who haven’t had the surgery. Their findings may help explain why bariatric surgery often leads to dramatic weight loss.

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To better understand the brain’s role in obesity, researchers examined 49 patients before and after they had gastric bypass surgery. They also scanned 18 obese people who hadn’t undergone any weight-loss surgery as a control group. Both groups underwent a type of brain imaging called functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure activity levels across different parts of the brain.

The researchers found that after surgery, patients’ brain activity decreased in several areas of the brain involved with sensory perception, including taste and hunger. The changes were greater in the patients who had the most weight loss.

Roux en y gastric bypass:

In addition, areas of the brain involved with reward and addiction showed increased activity. The researchers think that these changes may help patients avoid overeating after gastric bypass surgery by altering their perception of food or creating a greater feeling of satiety.

“As we learn more about how the brain responds to bariatric surgery, we hope to identify additional ways to improve long-term weight loss,” said lead author Dr. Emma Krentz. “Our findings also support further research into potential therapies that could mimic the beneficial effects of bypass surgery in people who are not able to have the operation.”

Bariatric surgery:

The researchers also found that patients who had the most weight loss tended to have a lower level of a substance called ghrelin in their blood before surgery. Ghrelin stimulates appetite and food-seeking behavior, so they were surprised to see it drop after surgery. In future research, they plan to study how ghrelin levels change after gastric bypass surgery and whether this might influence or predict long-term weight loss.

All right, this is not some sort of clickbait, but rather a news article published on one of the biggest medical websites. As you can see from the opening paragraph, all facts are true: gastric bypass leads to changes in brain activity that cause people to lose weight; these changes appear to be connected to a lower level of ghrelin in the blood.

The only problem is that I have absolutely no idea what any of this means, so if you do – please let me know. In fact, I don’t even know whether it’s possible to comment on this news article from a scientific perspective, because frankly speaking – I’m not a neuroscientist.

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Bariatric surgery pros and cons:

However, even though I don’t know anything about the brain and its role in obesity, I can tell this much: if there’s a study about gastric bypass being published in Nature Neuroscience – it’s got to be important. So take a look at the article yourself and let me know what you think.

The researchers next plan to investigate how changes in ghrelin levels affect weight loss after bariatric surgery. However, they also note that additional studies are needed to determine whether these findings will apply to people who have not undergone gastric bypass surgery, including those who receive other forms of obesity treatment such as medication or exercise regimens.

Gastric bypass before and after:

Though further evidence is needed from randomized controlled trials involving patients who have not undergone surgery, we think that our findings may help to inform the development of behavioral and pharmacological approaches for obesity treatment.

The team also says that more studies are needed into how changes in ghrelin levels affect weight loss after bariatric surgery and whether these findings will apply to people who have not undergone gastric bypass surgery, including those who receive other forms of obesity treatment such as medication or exercise regimens.

is bariatric surgery safe:

Our findings suggest that bypass surgery abolishes or reduces these metabolic and physiologic biases in favor of high-calorie foods. The beneficial effects on appetite and food preoccupation occur rapidly, while some cognitive changes develop more gradually, suggesting a complex multidirectional set of interactions between biological systems.

As we learn more about how the brain responds to bariatric surgery, we hope to identify additional ways to improve long-term weight loss,” said lead author Dr. Emma Krentz. “Our findings also support further research into potential therapies that could mimic the beneficial effects of bypass surgery in people who are not able to have the operation.”

In the future, we hope that it will be possible to identify people who would most benefit from gastric bypass surgery and develop novel therapies that mimic the effects of this operation without requiring major invasive surgery.”

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Gastric bypass pros and cons:

The researchers also found that patients who had the most weight loss tended to have a lower level of a substance called ghrelin in their blood before surgery. Ghrelin stimulates appetite and food-seeking behavior, so they were surprised to see it drop after surgery. In future research, they plan to study how ghrelin levels change after gastric bypass surgery and whether this might influence or predict long-term weight loss.

mimic the beneficial effects of bypass surgery in people who are not able to have the operation.

As we learn more about how the brain responds to bariatric surgery, we hope to identify additional ways to improve long-term weight loss,” said lead author Dr. Emma Krentz. “Our findings also support further research into potential therapies that could mimic the beneficial effects of bypass surgery in people who are not able to have the operation.”

In the future, we hope that it will be possible to identify people who would most benefit from gastric bypass surgery and develop novel therapies that mimic the effects of this operation without requiring major invasive surgery.”

Stomach surgery types:

Though further evidence is needed from randomized controlled trials involving patients who have not undergone surgery, we think that our findings may help to inform the development of behavioral and pharmacological approaches for obesity treatment.

Gastric bypass before and after. Our findings suggest that bypass surgery abolishes or reduces these metabolic and physiologic biases in favor of high-calorie foods. The beneficial effects on appetite and food preoccupation occur rapidly, while some cognitive changes develop more gradually, suggesting a complex multidirectional set of interactions between biological systems.

mimic the beneficial effects of bypass surgery in people who are not able to have the operation.

In the future, we hope that it will be possible to identify people who would most benefit from gastric bypass surgery and develop novel therapies that mimic the effects of this operation without requiring major invasive surgery.”

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