Benefits and Side effects of Zoloft

Benefits and Side effects of Zoloft

(1) It may help to ease painful menstruation. Zoloft is used for the treatment of Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder, which is very often characterized by physical symptoms such as abdominal bloating or swelling, breast tenderness, headache or migraine, joint or muscle pain, weight gain, and irritability. These may also be symptoms of depression.

“Zoloft for PMDD has been studied in over 3,000 women diagnosed with Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder worldwide.”

(2) Other studies have shown that Zoloft is superior to a placebo for treating Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS). Symptoms of PMS may include bloating, breast tenderness, headache or migraine, joint or muscle pain, weight gain, and irritability.

Women treated with fluoxetine for the premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) experienced remission of their symptoms. This study shows that fluoxetine is effective for treating premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD).

(3) Zoloft has also been found to be effective for treating Premenstrual Acne (PMA). Symptoms of PMA may include acne or pimples. Women treated with fluoxetine for the premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) experienced remission of their symptoms. This study shows that fluoxetine is effective for treating premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD).

(4) It may help to manage the symptoms of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder or OCD. Zoloft has been found to be effective for treating Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), which is a debilitating psychiatric condition that causes sufferers to experience unwanted thoughts or images (obsessions), and/or to repeat certain acts (compulsions) in a futile attempt to ignore or banish them.

(5) Zoloft may help treat Panic Disorder, which is an anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of intense fear accompanied by physical symptoms such as a pounding heart, sweating, and shaking.

Patients treated with fluoxetine experienced a significant improvement of their panic disorder as compared to those treated with a placebo. This is the first study that has systematically investigated the efficacy of fluoxetine in patients suffering from panic disorder.”

(6) Zoloft may be an effective treatment for Social Anxiety Disorder. Social Anxiety Disorder, or social phobia, involves intense fear of being watched and judged by others in social or performance situations to the extent that it causes severe emotional distress or interferes with normal work or social functioning.

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Patients treated with fluoxetine experienced significant improvement of their social anxiety disorder as compared to those treated with a placebo.

(7) Zoloft may help treat Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorder (OCSD), which is an umbrella term that includes the disorders of OCD, Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD), and Hypochondriasis (Health Anxiety). BDD is characterized by persistent obsessing over perceived defects or flaws in physical appearance.

Patients treated with fluoxetine for body dysmorphic disorder experienced a significant improvement in their symptoms as compared to those treated with a placebo.

(8) Zoloft may be an effective treatment for binge eating, which is characterized by recurrent episodes of rapid consumption of large amounts of food during which one’s sense of control is lost.

Patients treated with fluoxetine experienced significant improvement in binge eating as compared to those treated with a placebo.

(9) Zoloft may be an effective treatment for Bulimia Nervosa, which is characterized by recurrent episodes of binge eating followed by behaviors such as self-induced vomiting or the misuse of laxatives, diuretics, or enemas in an attempt to prevent weight gain.

Patients treated with fluoxetine experienced significant improvement of their bulimia as compared to those treated with a placebo.

(10) Zoloft may help treat Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD), which is severe physical and emotional symptoms that occur one week before a woman’s menstrual period. Symptoms of PMDD may include fatigue, anxiety, irritability, feeling out of control or overwhelmed, difficulty concentrating lack of interest in socializing with others, and food cravings.

Zoloft has been found to be effective for treating premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), which is a severe form of Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS). PMDD, like PMS, involves the cyclic occurrence of physical and emotional symptoms one week before menstruation.

Side effects of Zoloft:

What is the most important information I should know about Zoloft?

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You should not use this medicine if you have a history of a drug or alcohol abuse problem, if you are being treated for bipolar disorder (manic-depression), or if you take pimozide. Do not stop using sertraline suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Follow your doctor’s instructions about tapering your dose.

Do not use Zoloft if you are pregnant or breastfeeding a baby. Weight gain is more likely to occur in newborns whose mothers take sertraline during pregnancy or breastfeeding, especially for extended periods of time. Tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment.

Sertraline can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side-effects of sertraline, especially dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Some people also report mood changes, including anxiety, agitation, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, and unusual sadness or cheerfulness.

Sertraline dosage:

The usual dose of sertraline is 50 mg once daily, with or without food. If you have certain health problems or are taking other medicines, your doctor may recommend a lower dose, as indicated in the Zoloft Medication Guide/Patient Information Leaflet. Do not take more than 200 milligrams of this medicine each day.

How long does sertraline take to work for anxiety:

sertraline works well for moderate to severe depression and helps most people who take it. It may start working in 1 to 4 weeks, but it could take as long as 6-8 weeks after you start treatment before you feel the full effects of this medication.

Alcohol can make the side effects of sertraline worse. Drinking alcohol while taking Zoloft may cause increased dizziness, drowsiness, lightheadedness, difficulty concentrating, and other side effects. Use alcohol cautiously if you are taking sertraline. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have questions about how much alcohol you can drink.

Do not stop using sertraline suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Talk to your doctor about how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when stopping the medication.

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How long does Zoloft take to work for social anxiety:

It usually takes four weeks of treatment with sertraline to see a benefit. It may take a longer time for improvements in obsessive-compulsive disorder or panic attacks associated with depression to become evident.

How should I take Zoloft?

It is important to keep taking this medication even if you feel well. Do not stop using sertraline without talking to your doctor first, as doing so could cause unpleasant withdrawal symptoms.

Do not use Zoloft if you are pregnant. It may cause birth defects or bleeding problems in the newborn. Do not use this medication while breastfeeding a baby unless your doctor says it is okay.

What should I avoid while taking Zoloft?

Avoid drinking alcohol, as it can increase some of the side effects of sertraline and can cause more dizziness and drowsiness.

Zoloft interacts with many other drugs, especially:

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with sertraline, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible drug interactions are listed here.

the best time of day to take Zoloft for anxiety:-

Take Zoloft at about the same time each day, usually in the morning.

What other drugs will affect sertraline?

Do not take this medication with:

Taking certain MAO inhibitor medicines with this medication can cause a serious reaction that may include fever, rigid muscles, blood pressure changes, mental changes, confusion, irritability, trouble with coordination, and other side effects.

Most MAO inhibitors should not be taken 2 weeks before treatment with sertraline or after treatment with sertraline has ended. Ask your doctor when to start or stop taking this medication.

Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. Some medicines can cause unwanted or dangerous effects when used with sertraline.

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