Symptoms of Malaria

Symptoms of Malaria

The most common symptoms of malaria are fever, headache, and vomiting. In severe cases, malaria can cause seizures, coma, and death.

People with malaria often experience cycles of chills and fever. The fever usually comes on suddenly and lasts for a few days. After the fever goes away, the person may feel very tired and weak.

Other symptoms may include:

-Nausea

-Vomiting

-Anemia (a lack of red blood cells)

-Chest pain

-Rapid heart rate

-Kidney failure

-Seizures

-Coma

Malaria is caused by a parasite that is transmitted to people through the bite of an infected mosquito. The parasites multiply in the liver and then infect red blood cells, causing symptoms that include fever, shaking chills, and flu-like illness.

Symptoms can be mild to severe depending on the type of malaria (viva vs falciparum), how many parasites are in the body (which depends on how recently someone was infected with malaria), and whether or not a person has built up immunity to the parasite through previous exposure.

Malaria is diagnosed by examining a patient’s blood for signs of infection.

People who have a fever but cannot afford or access a diagnosis should seek care immediately in order to prevent death from complications such as respiratory distress due to fluid in the lungs, renal failure from low blood volume, pulmonary edema from low oxygen in the blood, or a severe decrease in consciousness from extremely low blood pressure.

Malaria is treated with medications such as artemisinins, mefloquine, and quinine. These treatments will cure nearly all cases of malaria if they are administered properly and soon enough after infection. If treatment is not available, the medication sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (Fansidar) can be used to prevent certain types of malaria that are resistant to other drugs until more effective medications become available.

Malaria is most common near the equator where it is transmitted year-round; however, it can occur farther north and south of this band depending on local rainfall patterns and how high an area’s average temperatures get.

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The best way to prevent malaria is to avoid mosquito bites by using insect repellent, wearing clothes that cover the body, and sleeping under a bed net. Malaria can also be prevented by taking antimalarial drugs before, during, and after travel to areas where the disease is present.

WHO states that there are around 216 million cases of malaria each year resulting in about 438 000 deaths. Children under five years of age account for about 70% of all malaria deaths. About 90% of these deaths occur in Africa.

Prevention is better than cure:

The most effective way to prevent malaria is to avoid getting bitten by mosquitoes in the first place. Use repellent on your skin and clothes, and sleep under a bed net. If you are traveling to a malaria area, take antimalarial drugs before, during, and after your trip.

There is no vaccine against malaria yet, but research is ongoing.

Malaria is a serious disease caused by a parasite that is transmitted to people through the bite of an infected mosquito. The parasites multiply in the liver and then infect red blood cells, causing symptoms that include fever, shaking chills, and flu-like illness. Malaria can be diagnosed by examining a patient’s blood for signs of infection and treated with medications such as artemisinins, mefloquine, and quinine.

These treatments will cure nearly all cases of malaria if they are administered properly and soon enough after infection. If treatment is not available, the medication sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (Fansidar) can be used to prevent certain types of malaria that are resistant to other drugs until more effective medications become available.

Malaria is most common near the equator where it is transmitted year-round; however, it can occur farther north and south of this band depending on local rainfall patterns and how high an area’s average temperatures get. The best way to prevent malaria is to avoid mosquito bites by using insect repellent, wearing clothes that cover the body, and sleeping under a bed net. There is no vaccine against malaria yet, but research is ongoing.

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what causes malaria:

Malaria is an infectious disease that can be transmitted from person to person via mosquitoes, caused by a parasite. The parasites are spread in the saliva of infected mosquitos when they bite.

There are five different types of malaria:

Plasmodium vivax malaria, Plasmodium ovale, Plasmodium malariae between, Plasmodium falciparum and recently discovered a vaccine for malaria has been developed called Mosquirix

Symptoms:

Symptoms typically occur 10–15 days after being bitten by an infected mosquito. Many people have no symptoms. When symptoms develop they usually start about a week after being infected. In general, mild symptoms last for 1–2 weeks and severe symptoms for 2–6 weeks.

Symptoms of malaria include High fever (40°C/104°F or above), shaking chills, flu-like illness with extreme tiredness, headache, and vomiting. Severe malaria is characterized by the following symptoms: Development of kidney failure (known as acute renal failure), low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), breathing difficulties, clotting problems which can cause a tendency to bruise or bleed easily, enlargement of the liver and spleen, jaundice (yellowish pigmentation of skin and eyes)

Diagnosis:

To diagnose malaria it is important to know that person has been in an area where there is a risk of infection. If this is so, they should seek medical treatment without waiting for the results of a blood test.

The most accurate method to detect malaria parasites in the body is a microscopic examination of stained thin and thick blood films (a blood sample taken on a slide), this procedure has been around since 1910.

It can tell if there are any “Plasmodium” parasites, but it cannot tell which species of parasite is causing infection or how much there is. If you have what look like malaria parasites in your bloodstream but the diagnosis has not been confirmed, you have malaria until proven otherwise (“malignant malaria”).

Prevention of malaria:

There is no vaccine for malaria. The only way to prevent malaria is to avoid mosquito bites.

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There are a number of ways to reduce your risk of being bitten by a mosquito:

– Use a mosquito repellent containing DEET on exposed skin and clothing, especially at night when mosquitoes are most active.

– Wear light-colored, loose-fitting clothing that covers as much of your skin as possible.

– Stay in well-screened or air-conditioned areas as much as possible.

Treatment:

Malaria is treated with anti-malarial drugs. The choice of drug depends on the species of the parasite causing the infection, where you acquired the infection, and your health status. If you are traveling to a malarious area, you may be advised to take preventive drugs to avoid becoming ill. This is called chemoprophylaxis and will almost always prevent malaria if taken correctly.

symptoms of malaria in babies:

In babies, malaria may cause fever, vomiting, diarrhea, dehydration, and seizures. If not treated, malaria can lead to death.

There is currently no vaccine for malaria in babies. The only way to prevent malaria is to avoid mosquito bites.

There are a number of ways to reduce your risk of being bitten by a mosquito:

– Use a mosquito repellent containing DEET on exposed skin and clothing, especially at night when mosquitoes are most active.

– Wear light-colored, loose-fitting clothing that covers as much of your skin as possible.

– Stay in well-screened or air-conditioned areas as much as possible.

Treatment for malaria in babies depends on the species of the parasite causing the infection, where you acquired the infection, and your baby’s age.

If malaria is not treated promptly, symptoms may get worse and lead to serious illness or death.

Malaria can cause jaundice (yellowish pigmentation of skin and eyes). If your baby has jaundice along with fever, it might be a sign of severe malaria. Your doctor should see your baby right away if either of these symptoms occurs.

Prevention:- There is currently no vaccine for malaria in babies. The only way to prevent malaria is to avoid mosquito bites.

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